Chocolate Orange Loaf Cake

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Nothing like a happy chocolate-y orange-y and super rich-y cake moment to cheer up the day. Never mind the calories – they are all worthwhile.

Chocolate Orange Loaf Cake (adapted from Nigella Lawson’s Nigella Kitchen)

Ingredients

  • 160g of soft unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 250g raw cane sugar
  • 120g of all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted
  • 2 eggs
  • the zest of 2 regular orange and juice of 1 (1/3 cup)

Method

Preheat the oven to 165oC.

Line the loaf pan with parchment paper and grease the sides.

Beat the already soft butter with the syrup and the sugar until you have a fairly smooth cream (you probably will still feel a bit of grit; should look like a large weak coffee with milk).

Mix the flour, baking soda, and cocoa powder together.  Sift the equivalent of a 1 tablespoonful of these dry ingredients into the sugar and butter. Mix well before beating in 1 egg. Then add another couple of spoonfuls of the dry ingredients before beating in the second egg.

Carry on beating in the remaining dry ingredients and then add, still beating, the orange zest and finally, gradually, the orange juice. At this stage, the batter may suddenly look dimpled, as if slightly curdled – if this happens, do not worry.

Pour and scrape the batter into the load pan and put in the stove for 45 minute. Test with a knife before taking it out.  A cake tester won’t come out entirely clean, as the point of this cake, light though it may be, is to have just a hint of inner stickiness. Let cool a little in its pan on a wire rack, then turn out with care and leave on the rack to cool.


Chocolate chunk meringue cake

meringue chocolate pistachio

Believe it or not, this was a last minute dessert. It looks spectacular, it tastes scrumptious and is a fool proof recipe. Home cooking doesn’t get much better than this…

Chocolate chunk meringue cake (adapted from Bill Granger‘s Easy)

Ingredients 

  • 6 egg whites
  • 220g golden caster sugar
  • 200g dark chocolate roughly chopped
  • 100g pistachio nuts,roughly chopped plus extra to decorate
  • 3oo mL double cream (or whipped cream)

Method

Pre-heat the oven to 160C.

In a sheet large enough to cover a baking tray draw a circle with 26cm diameter

Turn the paper around and put it on the tray

Whist the egg whites with an electric mixer until they form soft peaks. Add the sugar, one spoon of a time, whisking between every addition until all the sugar is well incorporated.

Fold in the chocolate and the sugar.

Transfer to the baking tray and spread  out, keeping the mixture roughly inside the circle.

Put in the oven for about 1h or until cooked through.

Beat the cream to soft peaks, spread over the meringue  once it is evenly cool. Scatter with extra pistachios.


Chocolate and beetroot brownies

beetroot brownies

In the aftermath of #beetrootgate, beetroot brownies… A slightly less guilty pleasure, with a rich and velvety texture. Truth to be said, I like this version better than the 100% chocolaty thing.

Chocolate and beetroot brownies (adapted from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall ‘s River Cottage Everyday)

Ingredients 

  • 250g of unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 250g dark chocolate (70% cocoa), broken into pieces
  • 3 medium eggs
  • 250g caster sugar
  • A pinch of salt
  • 150g whole meal flower
  • 1 teaspoon of baking powder (or according to instructions in the package)
  • 250g of beetroot, boiled until tender then peeled and grated.

Method

Set the oven to 180oC

Grease a baking tray, and cover the bottom with parchment paper.

Melt the chocolate and the butter in a bain marie. If you don’t have a proper double boiler (I don’t), just  fit a metal bowl over a small saucepan filed with a few centimeter  of water, making sure the bowl isn’t touching the water. Let the water boil, while mixing the butter and the chocolate until the mixture is well combined and glossy.

Whisk the eggs and the sugar until well combined. Then beat in the chocolate and butter  until smooth.

Combine the flour with salt and baking powder. Sift them over the chocolate mix. Gently fold in with a wooden spoon.

Finally, fold in the grated beetroot, and keep on folding gently. Be careful not to over mix – otherwise you will get though brownies

Put the mixture in a tin and smooth the top with a spatula.

Bake for 20-25min, or until a knife insert into the center come out slightly moisten or with a few crumbs attached.

Let it cool until you cut the squares.


Banana Bread with Walnuts and Chocolate

An excellent recipe to start  of the weekend: banana bread with walnuts and chocolate. I had done it once before, using Bill Granger’s recipe, but this time I decided to give a go Gordon Ramsay‘s take on it. It was definitely a more sophisticated cake, less chocolaty but with more flavors.

Banana Bread with Walnuts and Chocolate Chips

Ingredients 

  • 150g plain flour
  • 150g whole wheat flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 170g golden caster sugar
  • 75ml vegetable oil
  • 2 large free-range eggs
  • 150g natural yoghurt
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3 large (or 4 medium) very ripe bananas
  • 50g walnuts, chopped
  • 50g dark chocolate chips

Method 

Preheat the oven to 180C/Fan 160C/Gas 4. Butter and line a 2 litre loaf tin. Mix all the dry ingredients, except for the walnuts and chocolate chip, together in a bowl.

In another bowl, combine the vegetable oil, eggs, yoghurt and vanilla.

Peel and mash the bananas with a fork, then mix into the egg mixture.

Fold the wet ingredients into the dry mixture then quickly fold in the walnuts and chocolate chips. Try not to overmix the batter to ensure a moist loaf. Scoop the batter into the prepared tin.

Bake for about an hour until a skewer comes out clean when inserted into the centre of the loaf. If the bread is not ready, return it to the oven for another 10 minutes. Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes before turning out on to a wire rack. Cool completely before slicing and serving.


Banana and chocolate bread

What do to feed the 11-year-old for breakfast? Well, easy answer: banana and chocolate bread.  He even agreed to by my sous-chef, raised for the occasion and thanked profusely. The original recipe is by Bill Granger, found during  a totally random google search.

Banana and chocolate bread 

Ingredients 

  • 250g of  all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 125g  unsalted butter, softened
  • 250g caster (superfine) sugar (I used regular sugar)
  • 4 ripe bananas, mashed
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • Seeds of 1 vanilla pod
  • 175g good-quality dark or milk chocolate chips

Method

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Sift the flour and baking powder into a large bowl.

Mix the butter, sugar, banana, eggs, vanilla seeds and chocolate chips in a separate bowl.

Add to the dry ingredients and stir to combine, being careful not to over mix.

Pour the batter into a non-stick, or lightly greased and floured, 19 x 11 cm  loaf tin and bake for 1 hour 15 minutes, or until the bread is cooked when tested with a wooden skewer.

Leave to cool in the tin for 5 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool.


Red velvet cake

By a strange coincidence I started this blog a few days before my birthday. Actually, one of my first posts was about the ice cream cake my Mother used to do every year around my birthday .  This year, however, for some reason, I was not really in the mood for a creamy cold cake… I kept seeing red velvet cakes appearing on different TV shows and food magazines, much to the joy and delight of those who ate them. The New York Times described it as “a cake that can stop traffic”. If even the NY Times said it and Nigella had the recipe on her book and website, why not give it a go and try it for the dinner party?

As its own name says, the red velvet cake is red. Red in an unnatural shade of red. In case doubts that it should be red persist, it is layered with white frosting, to make the red go even redder. It is supposed to have a slight taste of cocoa and vanilla, and a velvety texture given by buttermilk. The red color is allegedly the result of the presence of anthocyanin in the cocoa, which becomes red in the presence of an acid, explaining the necessity of adding unusual ingredients in a cake like vinegar and buttermilk. Strictly speaking, the cocoa might turn to a reddish shade and become dark-red-brown…. To get the extra bright red, abundant food dye has to be added. No one knows for sure where the recipe comes from, whether it was created on the South of the United States or it was an experiment gone mad in a Canadian department store.  For sure, it seems to be a New World creation, as it is hardly ever seen on European cookbooks. In fact, I cannot remember ever seeing it for sale on this side of the Atlantic patisseries.

As this was a birthday cake, an elaborate decoration was expected. I had planned to do a flamenco style polka-dot pattern, being the number of red dots being equal to my age (approximately and vaguely equal- to avoid sticking candles on the cake, any excuse was worth trying). But… the butter cream was a bit more runny than it should have been, and though I had a perfect cylinder of marzipan to start with, cutting it in thin slices didn’t do any favors to its shape. It ended up as a Dali interpretation of a rustic Seville-olé red velvet cake (picture here). Per se, the name didn’t conceal the less-than-optimal decoration, but I earned  a lot points for imaginative and rhetoric culinary speech.

But, it all comes down to taste. And it tasted good. Very good, in fact: a very rich taste (not totally cocoa, but also not totally vanilla),  with a moist and sensuous texture. A pleasure as sinful and guilty as only cake can be.

Ingredients

Cake

  • 2 cups shortening (=226g; I replaced it with butter)
  • 3 cups of sugar (=600g)
  • 4 eggs
  • 4 ounces of red food coloring (I used 20ml in total)
  • 1 tablespoon of cocoa
  • 2 teaspoon salt
  • 5 cups flour (=640g)
  • 2 cups butter milk (=500ml)
  • 2 teaspoon baking soda
  • the seeds of 2 vanilla pods
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar (I used white balsamic, for no reason in particular. I just happened to have it on my cupboard).

Butter cream (frosting)

  • 10 table spoons flour (I used Maizena, as I like its flavor and consistency better than regular flour)
  • 2 cups milk (=500 ml)
  • 2 cups unsalted butter (=226g)
  • 2 cups sugar (=400g)
  • the seeds of 2 vanilla pods

Method

Cake

Preheat oven to 180oC. Butter and line 3 9″ baking pans with parchment paper (I used 3 squared trays)Place melted butter and sugar in bowl and beat until light and fluffy (about 10 minutes). Add eggs one at a time, beating after each addition.

Make a paste of the food colouring, cocoa and salt (I never got a paste, as 20ml were not enough to bind with the cocoa). Add to butter mixture.Mix vanilla with buttermilk. Dissolve baking soda in vinegar, add to butter milk (it gets a bit fizzy – you might want to consider to use a larger bowl).

Sift and measure flour; add to creamed shortening alternating with buttermilk mixture ending with flour. Mix until smooth approx. 4-5 minutes.Pour into pans. Bake 35-40 minutes. Remove from oven, cool 10 minutes, then invert cakes onto cooling rack and to cool completely before frosting.

Frosting

Make a paste with flour and a small amount of the milk. Add remaining milk gradually, mixing until smooth. Cook in a double boiler at medium heat until thick (do not forget to stir while cooking to avoid burning. If it gets to hot, remove it from the heat and stir to cool it a bid. It should be a very slow simmer. At the end, it will be a very thick mixture at end, but if you can see lumps it is pass it through a fine sieve). Let cool.

Cream butter with icing sugar and vanilla. Beat until fluffy. Add cooled flour mixture 1 spoon at a time, beating well between additions.

 

Chocolat Carré

2011-01-22_21

A mousse au chocolat variation by Vollenweider Chocolatier. Absolutely decadent.